MAKERS: Jenniffer Omaitz

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“I am so happy that I stepped out of my comfort zone. In the evolution of artists and painters I admire, change is part of their career dialogue.” I can see that Jenniffer Omaitz isn’t afraid to try new things, as she shows me around her Kent home I spy examples of her early work – works that look very different […]






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MOCA’s Constant: How To Engage Community?

The Artists Trust (detail) Liz Maugans

If you look at MOCA’s Constant as the Sun as a way to see what is going on in the region’s art world, you would see a sampling of wildly disparate practices. From straightforward documentation to generative exercises in community engagement, to quirky metaphor, the 10 individuals/collectives are all over the map in their motivations, their media, and their concepts. […]






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Gray’s to Auction Pollocks, Jim Dine, and Frank Stella from the Jacobs Group Collection Tomorrow

Are you looking to buy a Jackson Pollock? I’ll wager you didn’t know you could buy one right here in Cleveland tomorrow – well, if you make the winning bid. Most people are familiar with the big name auction houses – Sotheby’s and Christies move original works of art by famous artists like Pollock regularly. But there is a thriving secondary […]






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MAKERS: Dana Oldfather

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There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterwards you can remove all traces of reality. There’s no danger then, anyway, because the idea of the object will have left an indelible mark. — Pablo Picasso   “It feels very natural and good to be using figures again as the bones of these new paintings,” said Dana […]






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My American Dream: Keith Mayerson at MOCA

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There’s a magical-realist novella by the Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes, in which one of the characters creates dolls in the image of all the members of their family, and moves the dolls through the days of their lives. Keith Mayerson’s My American Dream, on view now at MOCA, along with the regional exhibit Constant as the Sun, is a little […]






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Thinking big with small pieces: After the Pedestal at The Sculpture Center

Beth Lindenberger, "Clear Divide," ceramic and ground brick.

“After the Pedestal” is the Sculpture Center’s tenth exhibition of smaller works. How small? Not small enough to be distracting. This isn’t a competition to see who can make the smallest recognizable image, or to cram the most detail into a compressed space. But even the largest pieces could be carried by one person (save perhaps Mark Rubelowsky’s aptly-named “Table.” […]






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