The Thirteenth Fire

Owning the history of the burning river |  The first twelve fires on the Cuyahoga River didn’t get much attention or do much to change the way our industries or governments viewed one of Cleveland’s defining features. But the thirteenth fire, which took place in 1969 and was reported in Time magazine, captured the attention of the nation. Not only […]

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Leadership Qualities: CAC Search Continues

It was late October, 2018 that Cuyahoga Arts and Culture hosted meetings with arts and cultural leaders to get input on a job description, to learn from constituents what leadership qualities are desirable in the organization’s next executive director. It’s a big job at a challenging time. Gary Hanson, a member of the CAC board who is working with the […]

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Rebecca Louise Law: Inspiring Awe in Toledo

Some exhibits beg the visitor to simply bathe in their glory, at least as a starting point, but also as an ongoing experience. They inspire a physical reaction of awe: you just want to stand in their presence and gaze, and take it in like the sun. The Cleveland Museum of Art and the Toledo Museum of Art each have […]

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The Murals Are the Message

Commissioned in bulk, murals have recently proliferated around Cleveland   At least one thing is happening very fast at City Hall: October 19, Mayor Frank Jackson’s office announced an extraordinary opportunity for a Cleveland artist—to help celebrate the tenth anniversary of our sister city relationship with Rouen, France, by traveling there to paint a large mural, eighty feet long by […]

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Did Cleveland Make You Proud?

Each issue of CAN looks ahead to a new season, but this time we’ve got to take a minute to look back on what just happened in Northeast Ohio. The FRONT International Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art is winding down. The inaugural CAN Triennial is behind us. Did Cleveland make you proud? In our view, the most important thing about […]

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RAILROAD FAME – Moniker: Identity Lost and Found explores the people and folklore of American rail yard graffiti at the Massillon Museum

Before the internet spread aerosol-painted, hip-hop style across the world, the word “graffiti” did not instantly conjure the wildly colorful, mural-sized graphics that all but define the term these days. Graffiti is as old as walls, of course, and its history is woven with diverse threads and intentions. A deeply informed exhibit at the Massillon Museum of Art explores one […]

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